Posts Tagged ‘Labels’

Tip for printing labels

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

Many people printing labels have problems during the printing process. Many times the paper jams and you just don’t know why. Well many times it turns out that the problem is that the wrong paper thickness has been chosen. Or more correctly, a paper type has not been selected, and the default paper type, plain paper, is automatically chosen for you. You might not get a lot of paper jams if you’re printing just a couple of pages, but if you’re printing a significant number of pages, you’re bound to get some jams.
The solution is pretty easy. Just go to your Printer Properties, then in Printing Preferences select a Paper Type, or Media Type as “Labels”. If there is no type “Labels”, then chose a thicker paper like “Bond Paper” or “Transparencies”. This might slow down your printing a bit, but it’s better than wasting labels on printer jams, and you’ll have no need to babysit your printer. If that doesn’t work and you really just need to get a new printer, here’s an option:

reducing paper jams when printing labels

Inkscape – How to make a cut out of a pattern

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

When designing label templates, have you ever needed to cut a shape out of an existing shape? Chances are, the answer is going to yes. If not, maybe you can just read on and maybe learn something new. I created two basic shapes in Inkscape (you’ll need it to edit the images). The first shape I created was the green square. The second shape I created was a Yellow star. If you need to view the picture below in more detail, right click on the picture and select “View Image”.

Label

The next step is to select the two objects. It doesn’t matter the order in which you select them. To select, click on the cursor at the top left of the picture, then click on one item, then hold the shift key down and select the next item. Then, as in the above picture, click on Path, then select Difference. The result is below.

Label

Then, you can do whatever you want to the picture after that. Use the “Edit Paths by Nodes” feature to really have fun. Click on the pointer icon below the cursor icon at the left to edit the paths by nodes.

Label

Address Labels – Treat them right

Tuesday, July 27th, 2010

Things can go fugazi if you don’t treat your address labels right. I don’t mean you should talk sweetly to them and buy them candy and jewelry and take them out on expensive dates. You need to keep them out of the sun. Really, many times you don’t realize it, but labels can come in contact with direct sunlight sometimes when you leave them out on your desk, and your desk happens to be near a window. If you wouldn’t leave your beer in direct sunlight, why would you do that to your labels. Even worse, don’t forget to close your windows (if you’re fortunate enough to have opening windows at work), when you go home for the day. One winter, our building got a little too warm, so we opened up some windows. Somebody, ahem, forgot to close a few windows. That night there was a big snow storm. When we came in that morning, there was a snow drift on a couple of desks. You don’t know how weird it is to see a snow drift in the office. Needless to say, snow is not good for labels. Any kind of moisture will affect label performance adversely. So keep your address labels, shipping labels and really, any kind of labels in a nice dark storage closet, not to humid, not to dry. Your labels will last longer, look better, and you’ll be happier.

Touchdown Jesus has been destroyed.

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

That’s right folks, Touchdown Jesus

Touchdown Jesus has been struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Lot’s of people thought it was made of stone, but no, it was made of flammable material. You know, when you make something, you’ve got to put quality first. That’s what we do at MacoLabels.com. We sell high quality labels at great prices. I can’t say what would happen if our labels were struck by lightning because we never made a giant Jesus out of labels.

A week off will do you good

Monday, May 24th, 2010

It’s good to take a break sometimes. A week away from the hustle and bustle of getting to work on time will put you at ease. Treat yourself to some time off. Just have your boss call us, and we’ll try to convince them that you’re worth at least a weeks vacation.
Ahh, but the world does not stop when we go on vacation. Companies still need labels and they keep promoting and producing. That means mailings to potential customers and more labels. Back to work! :)

I’ll never get sick of making ML-0600 templates

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Here’s a generic ML-0600 template. It took a few minutes to create the jpeg in the GIMP.

ML-0600, template, same as Avery 5164 template

Finding a good Printer

Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

We are often asked by our customers when they print Maco labels, what kind of printer should we get to use with your labels? A great place to start would be to read some reviews. There are so many printers to choose from. There are Laser printers, Color Laser printers, Inkjet printers, All in one printers, Thermal Wax printers,
Try cnet, it’s a great site for many things including reviews.
http://reviews.cnet.com/1770-5_7-0.html?query=printers&tag=srch

There are so many options, you have to consider; price, performance, operational costs, (TOC Total Cost of Ownership), and quality, and cnet.com is a fantastic resource to help you choose.

Printing address labels in Access is challenging

Monday, December 14th, 2009

If you have Microsoft Access , you will be able to print labels no problem..maybe. The reason I say that is that some labels have no margins on the right or left. Some of our customers still have the Maco M-5363 that are discontinued. If you try to create a report in MS Access for this label layout, you’ll find that your minimum page margins are controlled by your printer. If your printer can’t print full bleed, then you’ll have to experiment around the report layout, and adjust your labels according to your printers margins. If your printer does print full bleed, all the way out to the edge of an 8.5 x 11 page, then you should be able to use the layout I created in Access unmodified. Here is the sample database in Access 2007 format:

http://www.macolabels.com/templates/Database1.accdb

Word Doc Columns converted to Merge Table

Friday, December 11th, 2009

Among other assumptions, we assume you have Word 2007, and that you have a significant number of names so that cut and pasting would be impractical. The document could be formatted a couple of different ways. If a document has 2 columns, you can have actual columns, or things that look like columns, but are not really columns which I call pseudo columns. Pseudo columns are created like so:

Jack Frost [tab][tab][tab]Victor Frost
1 North Pole Way[tab][tab][tab]2 North Pole Way
North Pole, NJ 07601[tab][tab][tab]North Pole, NJ 07601

Bob Bright [tab][tab][tab]Maggie Moth
22 Ivan Ho Way[tab][tab][tab]393 Manlott Dr
Hackensack, NJ 07601[tab][tab][tab]San Juan, PR 00601

The [tab] represents a tab character. If you did it this way, it’s a bit messy but still workable. To fix it up you need to do a search and replace to convert all multiple tabs to single tabs so that your document will look like:

Jack Frost [tab]Victor Frost
1 North Pole Way[tab]2 North Pole Way
North Pole, NJ 07601[tab]North Pole, NJ 07601

Bob Bright[tab]Maggie Moth
22 Ivan Ho Way[tab]393 Manlott Dr
Hackensack, NJ 07601[tab]San Juan, PR 00601

Then select the whole document, and click on the “Insert” tab. Click on the “Table” icon and select “Convert Text to Table”. Make sure you have the “Paragraphs” radio button selected under the “Separate text at” section. Click OK, then you will have a table with two columns.
Next, you need to cut the second column, then paste it at the bottom of the first column. The result is that you will have two columns of data. Make sure you have a two blank cells as your last two cells in the first column. (Paste the cut column into the very last cell of the first column)
Ok, save the file as an Plain text. Make sure that you you have “MS-DOS” selected and “Insert line breaks” Selected, and “End lines with” “CR/LF” in the “File Conversion” popup window.
Ok, now open the text document in Word. You should have one column of names and addresses.
**actual column start point**
Now you have one column of names that you need to convert to a table. Do a search and replace. Replace all double paragraph marks (^p^p) with single manual page breaks (^m). Next, replace all single paragraph marks (^p) with tab (^t). Now replace all manual page breaks (^m) with manual line breaks (^l). You can now use the file as a merge file, or open the text file directly in Excel, save it as an Excel document and use it as the merge table.
Now I’ll hand it off to Microsoft for merging directions:

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/h…

The process would be much the same if you had two true columns. But first you would make the document into 1 column, and just go to the spot I marked as **actual column start point**, and continue.
Ok, so it’s not so easy, but it is the easiest way to do it in my opinion.
If you need a template for the 5164, we’ve got a few to choose from at:
http://www.macolabels.com/ml-0600-templates.html
Our ML-0600 is comparable to the Avery 5164 shipping label.
You could also use the data for an ML-3000 label which is Avery 5160 laser label and inkjet label compatible.